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Little Gods A Collection of Fragments by Stefan Matthew Olson

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  • 6 Currently reading

Published by AuthorHouse .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Horror & ghost stories,
  • Horror - General,
  • Fiction / Horror,
  • Fiction,
  • Fiction - Horror,
  • Horror

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages392
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL11973090M
ISBN 10143433144X
ISBN 109781434331441
OCLC/WorldCa176873821

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Little Gods is depressing from the get-go but I guess that just contributes to engaging the reader. Richards' writing is impeccable and her flair for language is beautifully and amazingly displayed in Little Gods. While many may criticise the lengthiness of the book, I assure that you will not regret reading it to the end/5. Meng Jins debut novel LITTLE GODS attempts to answer that in an incredibly complex character study of Su Lan, a person who keeps reinventing herself across cities and continents. The book opens against the backdrop of the Tiananmen Square demonstrations in , where a maternity nurse, looking after Su Lan and her newborn, makes a pointed /5.   Steeped in trauma, loss, and imperfect love, Little Gods is a novel about performing the self, filtered through academia, abandonment, and migration. This is a smart and emotionally devastating novel. Little Gods is a page-turner—but all the while it winks, reminding us that possible explanations in our universe are as varied as the beings who populate it." (The Paris Review, Staff Pick) "Little Gods is built from familiar tropes: love amid violence, lost parents, secrets held by those closest to us. But Jin brings a fresh imagination to /5(34).

  Book reviews ★ Little Gods Meng Jin Review by Omar El Akkad. January Little Gods, which in the first few pages may feel like a story centered on Tiananmen but quickly and in the most satisfying way transforms into a meditation on ambition, love and time. In a particularly brilliant act of alchemy, the novel finds new ways to dissect.   This reality — the excising of the 'first self,' which Little Gods deliberately spotlights with heartbreaking clarity, or a superficial flattening of the full life before — is one that tends to underpin our perceptions of immigrant households and perhaps every corner of San Francisco’s prominent yet insular Chinese community. And yet 3/4(10). But when viewed as a whole, Little Gods is like a jigsaw that falls into place as soon as you close the final page. An intricate novel about grief, loss, memory and the self as it relates to one's culture, Little Gods is a smart, emotionally charged novel that at times is nearly as elusive as Su Lan's character, but well worth the effort.   Little Gods is a page-turner—but all the while it winks, reminding us that possible explanations in our universe are as varied as the beings who populate it." — The Paris Review, Staff Pick "Little Gods is built from familiar tropes: love amid violence, lost parents, secrets held by those closest to us.

  A story of migrations literal and emotional, spanning time, space and class, Little Gods is a sharp yet expansive exploration of the aftermath of unfulfilled dreams, an immigrant story in negative that grapples with our tenuous connections to memory, history, and self.   Question: "Are Christians 'little gods'?" Answer: Some theological systems, such as Mormonism, teach the heresy that people can become gods in their own right. Roman Catholicism teaches what it calls the divinization of men: “The only-begotten Son of God, wanting to make us sharers in his divinity, assumed our nature, so that he, made man, might make men gods” . A story of migrations literal and emotional, spanning time, space and class, Little Gods is a sharp yet expansive exploration of the aftermath of unfulfilled dreams, an immigrant story in negative that grapples with our tenuous connections to memory, history, and self.   Little Gods is a coming-of-age tale with gothic undertones about twelve-year-old Olive Lovelock navigating her place in a web of family secrets. Set in country Victoria, this book swirls with parents, aunts, uncles, cousins, classmates, and townsfolk, all of whom seem to know more about Olive’s past than Olive herself.