An acte for punishment of rogues, vagabonds and sturdie beggers
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An acte for punishment of rogues, vagabonds and sturdie beggers by Queen Elizabeth I

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Published by Deputies of C. Barker in [S.l .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Rogues and vagabonds -- England,
  • Great Britain -- History -- Elizabeth, 1558-1603,
  • Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1558-1603

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEarly English books, 1475-1640 -- 1728:3
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[3] p
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15187639M

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Statute of the Realm , E czj4, p. This is an extract from an Act for punishment of rogues, vagabonds and sturdy beggars, passed in in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. The Vagabonds Act was a law passed in England under Queen Elizabeth I. It is a part of the Tudor Poor Laws and a predecessor to the Elizabethan Poor Laws.. The act provided that justices of the peace were to register the names of the "aged, decayed, and impotent" poor to determine how much money was required to care for them. The justices of the peace would then assess all Citation: 14 Eliz. I c. 5. An acte for punishment of rogues, vagabonds and sturdie beggers Published: () By the King. A proclamation for the punishing of vagabonds, rogues, and idle persons Published: () The sonne of the rogue, or The politick theefe: With the antiquitie of theeves. Opening showing: An acte for punishment of rogues, vagabonds and sturdie beggers Shakespeare’s move from the market town of Stratford-upon-Avon to the capital at some point in the s embodied both the traditional trajectory of youthful ambition and a more general trend of urbanisation and gravitation towards London, the one major English city of the early modern period.

  Rogues, Vagabonds, and Sturdy Beggars collects significant rogue books and cony catching pamphlets. Given the renewed interest in such texts in recent years, their availability in a modern edition is a considerable boon to Renaissance scholars -- especially in an edition enhanced by Kinney's thorough and informative : University of Massachusetts Press. If the ways and slang of Vagabonds and Beggars interested Martin Luther enough to make him write a preface to the Liber Vagatorum in , two of the ungodly may be excused for caring, in , for the old Rogues of their English land, and for putting together three of the earliest tracts about them. Moreover, these tracts are part of the illustrative matter that we want round our great book. Welcome to the Rogues and Vagabonds Management website. For details of where our clients are currently performing see the NEWS section or our TWITTER feed at the top of this page. The English rogue. continued in the life of Meriton latroon and other extravagants, comprehending the most eminent cheats of both sexes. by: Head, Richard, ?? Published: ().

An acte for punishment of rogues, vagabonds and sturdie beggers [microform] An acte for punishment of rogues, vagabonds and sturdie beggers [electronic resource] By the King [microform]: a proclamation for the execution of the statutes made against rogues and vagab. The Elizabethan age was one of unbounded vitality and exuberance; nowhere is the color and action of life more vividly revealed than in the rogue books and cony-catching (confidence game) pamphlets of the sixteenth century. This book presents seven of the age's liveliest works: Walker's Manifest Detection of Dice Play; Awdeley's Fraternity of Vagabonds; Harman's Caveat for Common Cursitors 5/5(1). The rogues and vagabonds of Shakespeare's youth: Awdeley's Fraternitye of vacabondes and Harman's Caveat [Edward Viles, F. J. Furnivall] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. About the Book Theatre has been an important part of British and Irish culture, dating back to the Roman occupation. Medieval mystery plays and morality plays were performed at religious festivals. In , another Elizabethan Act:(4) An Acte for Punishment of Rogues, Vagabonds, and Sturdie Beggers, increased the punishments for what we should now call 'mediumship.' For instance, it applied to 'All idle persons going about in any countrey either begging or using any subtile craft, of fayning themselves to have knowledge in Physiognomie.